Prime Minister's Questions: 22 May 2019 - Brexit, historic allegations against veterans, schools


https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/may/prime-ministers-questions-22-may-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber." />
Prime Minister Theresa May answered MPs' questions on Brexit, historic allegations against veterans who served in Northern Ireland, schools funding and more.

https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/may/prime-ministers-questions-22-may-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Statement on Leaving the European Union - 22 May 2019


Following her speech on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill yesterday, Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement to the House of Commons on leaving the EU.

Immunity for soldiers e-petition debate - 20 May 2019


https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/243947

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws." />
MPs debate a petition about immunity for soldiers. The debate will be opened by Damien Moore MP, a member of the Petitions Committee.

View the petition and the Government response:

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/243947

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws.

The Speaker Explains: Granting Urgent Questions


https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/urgent-questions/

Follow the House of Commons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber: https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons " />
We asked John Bercow, Speaker of the House of Commons, to explain how he decides which urgent questions to grant.

If an urgent or important matter arises which an MP believes requires an immediate answer from a government minister, they may apply to the Speaker to ask an urgent question.

Find out more about urgent questions: https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/urgent-questions/

Follow the House of Commons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber: https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons

Prime Minister's Questions: 15 May 2019 - inequality, food poverty, climate change


https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/may/prime-ministers-questions-15-may-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber." />
The Prime Minister, Theresa May, answered questions from MPs in the House of Commons on Wednesday 15 May 2019.

https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/may/prime-ministers-questions-15-may-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Netting hedgerows to prevent birds nesting e-petition debate - 13 May 2019


https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/244233

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws." />
MPs debate an e-petition on making 'netting' hedgerows to prevent birds from nesting a criminal offence. The debate will be opened by Mike Hill MP, a member of the Petitions Committee.

View the petition and the Government response:

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/244233

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws.

Nancy Astor: First Steps Towards a Better Balanced World


The Speaker's Advisory Committee On Works Of Art International Women's Day Lecture.

Dr Jacqui Turner, University of Reading, is this year's guest speaker and will be speaking on "Nancy Astor: First Steps Towards a Better Balanced World" as part of the Astor 100 celebrations to mark the centenary of Nancy Astor being the first woman MP to take her seat in the House of Commons as MP for Plymouth Sutton. The paper will reflect Astor's achievements and how she has become a totem for women and democracy despite her flaws.

Dr Jacqui Turner is from Reading University where the Astor Archive is held. She is a lecturer in Modern History and the Director of Outreach and Widening Participation for the History Department. She was a significant contributor to Parliament’s Vote100 project, curating a display on Nancy Astor and writing for the Voice and Vote exhibition catalogue. Dr Turner has been working with the Astor Archive for some years and can be considered one of, if not the, leading experts on Nancy Astor.

An introduction will be given by Luke Pollard, MP for Plymouth Sutton and Devonport, an active supporter of Astor100. [This is the first time a man has given the extended introduction to Parliament’s International Women’s Day lecture.]

Prime Minister's Questions: 8 May 2019 - Brexit, public services funding, Palace of Westminster


https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber." />
The Prime Minister, Theresa May, answered questions from MPs in the House of Commons on Wednesday 8 May 2019.

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Climate Change - MPs declare an environment and climate emergency


MPs debated whether an environmental emergency should be declared. This follows the findings of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change that global emissions need to fall by around 45% by the year 2030 (from 2010 levels) to avoid a more than 1.5% rise in global warming.

Note: This video is an archived copy of the YouTube live stream. The debate begins at 9:31

Because today is an Opposition Day in the House of Commons, the subject for debate has been chosen by the Labour Party.

Motion to be debated today

‘That this House declares an environment and climate emergency following the finding of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change that to avoid a more than 1.5°C rise in global warming, global emissions would need to fall by around 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030, reaching net zero by around 2050; recognises the devastating impact that volatile and extreme weather will have on UK food production, water availability, public health and through flooding and wildfire damage; notes that the UK is currently missing almost all of its biodiversity targets, with an alarming trend in species decline, and that cuts of 50 per cent to the funding of Natural England are counterproductive to tackling those problems; calls on the Government to increase the ambition of the UK’s climate change targets under the Climate Change Act 2008 to achieve net zero emissions before 2050, to increase support for and set ambitious, short-term targets for the roll-out of renewable and low carbon energy and transport, and to move swiftly to capture economic opportunities and green jobs in the low carbon economy while managing risks for workers and communities currently reliant on carbon intensive sectors; and further calls on the Government to lay before the House within the next six months urgent proposals to restore the UK’s natural environment and to deliver a circular, zero waste economy.’

What is an Opposition day?

Usually the Government decides what is debated in the Chamber but twenty days in each session are set aside for debates on subjects chosen by the Opposition. The Leader of the Opposition (currently Jeremy Corbyn, Labour) gets 17 days. The other three days are allocated to the third largest party in the House (currently The Scottish National Party).

Parliamentary sessions usually last for a year but if a session lasts longer than a year, the whips may agree on a further number of Opposition days. And the Government may provide further ‘unallotted’ Opposition days, even in a normal year-long session. Some of these might be used for the smaller political parties to choose the subject for debate.

The Opposition sometimes table a motion in the form of a humble address on Opposition days. A humble address is a message to the Queen. It’s used, among other things to call for papers from departments headed by a Secretary of State.

Prime Minister's Questions: 1 May 2019 - Climate change, crime, inequality


https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber." />
The Prime Minister, Theresa May, answered questions from MPs in the House of Commons on Wednesday 1 May 2019.

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Online abuse e-petition debate - 29 April 2019


https://petition.parliament.uk/archived/petitions/190627

View the Committee's inquiry report and recommendations:

https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/petitions-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/online-abuse-17-19/

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws." />
MPs debate the e-petition started by Katie Price on the online abuse experienced by disabled people in the UK. #OnlineAbuseDebate

View the petition and the Government response:

https://petition.parliament.uk/archived/petitions/190627

View the Committee's inquiry report and recommendations:

https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/petitions-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/online-abuse-17-19/

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws.

Prime Minister's Questions: 24 April 2019


https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber." />
David Lidington stands in for Theresa May at PMQs on Wednesday 24 April 2019.

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

Emily Thornberry is standing in for the Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, she will ask six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party will ask two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Prime Minister's Questions: 10 April 2019 - Universal Credit, Local Government funding, Article 50


https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/april/prime-ministers-questions-10-april-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber." />
The Prime Minister, Theresa May, answered questions from MPs in the House of Commons on Wednesday 10 April 2019.

https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/april/prime-ministers-questions-10-april-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

The Speaker Explains: Selecting Amendments and New Clauses


https://www.parliament.uk/business/commons/the-speaker/the-role-of-the-speaker/role-of-the-speaker/

Follow the House of Commons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber: https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons " />
We asked John Bercow, Speaker of the House of Commons, to explain how amendments and new clauses are selected to be debated and voted on.

Amendments are changes to a motion or a bill and new clauses are additions to a bill. MPs can put forward amendments and new clauses, but not all are voted on. It is part of the role of the Chair - often the Speaker - to select which are put to a vote.

Find out more about the role of the Speaker: https://www.parliament.uk/business/commons/the-speaker/the-role-of-the-speaker/role-of-the-speaker/

Follow the House of Commons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber: https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons
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