Memory, Modularity, and the Theory of Deep Learnability


A Google TechTalk, 2019/04/04, presented by Rina Panigrahy.
ABSTRACT: Why does deep learning work well for some applications and not for others? Do we need major architectural changes in deep learning to solve complex problems like natural language understanding and logic? Does memory and modular organization play an important role, and if so, how do we store complex concepts in memory? We will try to get a conceptual understanding of these questions by studying learning problems arising from synthetic mathematical function classes such as the learnability of polynomials, shallow teacher networks, and possible cryptographic hardness of learning deeper teacher networks. Finally we will present nascent ideas about how we should model memory and evolve a modular view of deep learning for higher level cognitive functions.

About the Speaker: Rina Panigrahy is a Research Scientist at Google specializing in applied and theoretical algorithms in areas such as deep learning, high dimensional search, hashing, sketching, streaming, prediction and graph analysis with engineering and research impact covering over 75 publications and 50 patents. His Masters thesis work at MIT was used in founding Akamai Technologies. He has held research and engineering positions at Microsoft(principal researcher) and Cisco Systems. He obtained his Ph.D. in Algorithms from Stanford, and did his undergrad from IIT Mumbai after securing the top rank at the IIT-JEE entrance examination all over India. He is a recipient of a Gold medal at the International Math Olympiad and a winner of several best paper awards.

Haskell 101


https://github.com/google/haskell-trainings " />
A Google TechTalk, 2018-04-26, presented by Antoine Leblanc
ABSTRACT: Part 1 of 2, a tutorial on Haskell features. Lesson resources are available at https://github.com/google/haskell-trainings

Haskell 102


https://github.com/google/haskell-trainings " />
A Google TechTalk, 2018-04-26, presented by Antoine Leblanc
ABSTRACT: Part 2 of 2, a tutorial on Haskell features. Lesson resources are available at https://github.com/google/haskell-trainings

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: How to Develop in Core Blockly


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Neil Fraser
ABSTRACT: Demo of how the Blockly team typically works in core Blockly and why you don't need to be compiling.

About the speaker: Neil joined Google twelve years ago to work on the synchronization algorithm for Google Docs. Since then he has worked on a number of projects, including Blockly. Outside of work, Neil builds robots, cycles, and plays with his 2yo daughter -- preferably not at the same time.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: Show and Tell of New Features for Blockly


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Rachel Fenichel
ABSTRACT: Overview of the major changes to Blockly over the last couple of years, including typed variables, performance, and developer APIs.

About the speaker: Rachel is a software engineer at Google and an expert in all things Blockly. She has spent the last three years working on Blockly and Scratch Blocks, and she can tell you more than you want to know about cross-platform mouse/pointer event handling.

Rachel likes to bake bread, ride her bike, and curl up with a good book.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: SpheroEDU


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Jeff Couch
ABSTRACT: An overview of SpheroEDU and how they provide multiple ways to program: drawing, blocks, and text.

About the speaker: Jeff Couch is the Education Sales Manager for the West for Sphero Edu. He has spent been selling products and services to schools and school districts throughout the world for nearly a decade now. Sphero provides a toolset that is unbounded in its potential. While coding and 21st Century skills are necessary, the Sphero Edu program goes beyond code by incorporating robotics and technology with collaborative STEAM activities, nurturing students' imaginations in ways no other education program can.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: edublocks.org


https://edublocks.org/ ), why it was built, and how it is used around the world.

About the speaker: My name is Josh (@all_about_code) and I am a 14-year-old coder, passionate about sharing my skills with others. I am the creator of EduBlocks, a drag and drop version of Python 3 which allows students to learn the Python syntax with minimal errors, thus allowing younger children to access Python. This software is now being used in 95+ different countries around the world by students and teachers alike and has recently included a micro:bit editor. I deliver numerous workshops around the country sharing my passion for coding to people of all ages, including CPD sessions for teachers. In 2017 I was awarded a John Pinner Award at PyCon UK for my contribution to the coding community. This year I spoke at and ran workshops at MiXiT in Lyon as well as giving a Keynote to the Education Summit at PyCon USA. I am also proud to be a pi-top futureCHAMPION."" />
A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Josh Lowe
ABSTRACT: An overview of EduBlocks (https://edublocks.org/ ), why it was built, and how it is used around the world.

About the speaker: My name is Josh (@all_about_code) and I am a 14-year-old coder, passionate about sharing my skills with others. I am the creator of EduBlocks, a drag and drop version of Python 3 which allows students to learn the Python syntax with minimal errors, thus allowing younger children to access Python. This software is now being used in 95+ different countries around the world by students and teachers alike and has recently included a micro:bit editor. I deliver numerous workshops around the country sharing my passion for coding to people of all ages, including CPD sessions for teachers. In 2017 I was awarded a John Pinner Award at PyCon UK for my contribution to the coding community. This year I spoke at and ran workshops at MiXiT in Lyon as well as giving a Keynote to the Education Summit at PyCon USA. I am also proud to be a pi-top futureCHAMPION."

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: Blockly on Mobile Devices


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Andrew N. Marshall
ABSTRACT: Demo of how to set up Blockly in a WebView when building an Android or iOS app.

About the speaker: Andrew has been a Blockly engineer for three years, and Googler for six. He has a long career in educational software, including language, medical, and military applications. When away from the computer, you’re likely to find him roaming up and down the coast on two wheels.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: Tips for Creating a Block Language with Blockly


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Andrew N. Marshall
ABSTRACT: A brief overview of language considerations when designing a block based language. Whether you're using icons, natural language, or code with syntax the design decisions you make should fit your intended audience.

About the speaker: Andrew has been a Blockly engineer for three years, and Googler for six. He has a long career in educational software, including language, medical, and military applications. When away from the computer, you’re likely to find him roaming up and down the coast on two wheels.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: Welcome and The History of Blockly


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Tina Ornduff and Neil Fraser
ABSTRACT: Welcome to the summit and a history of Blockly. How it got started, what has changed over the years, and who was involved.

About the speakers: Tina is an 11+ year veteran of Google's Engineering Education team. She is currently a program manager for several education projects at Google. Outside of Google, she enjoys baking, cycling, running, and spending time with her husband and two sons.

Neil joined Google twelve years ago to work on the synchronization algorithm for Google Docs. Since then he has worked on a number of projects, including Blockly. Outside of work, Neil builds robots, cycles, and plays with his 2yo daughter -- preferably not at the same time.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: How to Write a Good Pull Request


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Rachel Fenichel
ABSTRACT: What the Blockly team looks for in a pull request and how to be a good contributor to Blockly's codebase.

About the speaker: Rachel is a software engineer at Google and an expert in all things Blockly. She has spent the last three years working on Blockly and Scratch Blocks, and she can tell you more than you want to know about cross-platform mouse/pointer event handling.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: Where Are We Going?


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Erik Pasternak
ABSTRACT: Overview of Blockly's plans for 2019 with context around where we are now.

About the speaker: Erik joined Google 8 years ago after completing a master's in educational robotics. He's worked on a variety of projects under Android before moving back into the education space. He now manages the Blockly team and works with several other teams at Google.

When not at work, Erik spends time with his son, cooks, and plays games.

Blockly Developer Summit 2018: Localizing Blocks and Apps


A Google TechTalk, 2018-09-20 and 21, presented by Andrew N. Marshall
ABSTRACT: A deep dive into Blockly's message localization features and how to write good comments for translators.

About the speaker: Andrew has been a Blockly engineer for three years, and Googler for six. He has a long career in educational software, including language, medical, and military applications. When away from the computer, you’re likely to find him roaming up and down the coast on two wheels.

Confidentiality In A Post Quantum World: the case of LEDAkem and LEDApkc


A Google TechTalk, 2018-12-05, presented by Alessandro Barenghi
ABSTRACT: This talk will present LEDAkem and LEDApkc, a key agreement scheme and a public key encryption scheme resistant against attacks with both classical and quantum computers.

In this talk I will present the schemes and report recent results on
how we can automatically generate key sizes and cryptosystem parameters tailored for a desired security level, providing practical performance figures.

About the speaker: Alessandro Barenghi is currently assistant professor at Politecnico di Milano, and one of the proposers of the LEDAkem/LEDApkc cryptoschemes to the NIST post-quantum standardization initiative.

Perception Cues For Social Platforms


A Google TechTalk, 2018-11-12, presented by Eakta Jain
ABSTRACT: As eye-tracking becomes a built-in service for virtual and augmented reality headsets, I am interested in converting gaze data into usable information. In this talk, I will give an overview of three projects from my lab at University of Florida that use perception cues toward different goals.

(I)In the attention economy, what is the relative importance of pictorial and text elements on a website? Simply put, we use eye-tracking to quantify how many words a picture is worth.
(II) As eye-tracking becomes a built-in service for virtual and augmented reality, can we extract more than gaze positions from it? Specifically, we infer user engagement from pupil diameter changes.
(III) Looking ahead to social virtual reality, what would it take to create avatars for child users? We investigate how users perceive adult and child motion capture data.

About the speaker: Prof. Eakta Jain

Eakta Jain is an Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the University of Florida. She received her PhD and MS degrees in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University and her B.Tech. degree from IIT Kanpur. She has worked in industrial research at Texas Instruments R&D labs, Disney Research Pittsburgh, and the Walt Disney Animation Studios. Her research group at the University of Florida is funded through faculty research awards from Facebook/Oculus and Google/YouTube, federal funding from the National Science Foundation, and state funding from the Florida Department of Transportation.
"